The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

Louis XV Martin clock- The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

Hunt scenes, like those on the bracket of the fine Louis XV Martin clock, were typical of painted decoration of the eighteen century, along with other pastoral subjects. The Chalmazel Room the only one in the chateau to have still lifes and landscapes painted directly on the wood paneling.

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre, presents the tradition of painted furniture as it developed in Europe and the United States. This book can be purchased from Amazon for as little as $3.99

From Publishers Weekly

The art of lacquering was introduced to France from the Orient in the late 17th century. By the 18th century, native-made, richly colored and detailed painted furniture was "the rage of French society"as exemplified by pieces treated with opulent vernis Martin, a green varnish enhanced by gold dust. In a work that will be most valuable to art historians, interior designers and collectors, de Dampierre, who owns a New York gallery specializing in painted furniture, also traces the ascendancy of this decorative art form in Italy, Spain, Portugal, England, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Denmark and America, exploring the influence of politics on art. The 18th and 19th century pieces of painted furnituremost made of wood, but some of metal and papier-macherange from sophisticated French and Italian examples to simpler, more provincial American and northern European folk-art pieces. Lavishly illustrated with color pictures, the inspiring volume also displays some contemporary rooms that utilize painted pieces and offers some tips on the care of painted furniture.

From Library Journal

While the art of painted furniture can be traced back to the Egyptians, Dampierre details the history beginning with the China trade to Europe in the late 17th century. The French were first in the West to develop a method for glazing and coloring furniture, objects, and paneling. In parallel movements across Europe, craftsmen adapted ideas and techniques. Various chapters discuss these embellishments and treatments from high art elegance to folk art simplicity, and there is a short chapter on the care of painted furniture. Beautifully photographed, this work complements Dean A. Fales, Jr.'s American Painted Furniture 1660-1880, ( LJ 11/1/72). Recommended for all decorative arts collections. Judith Yankielun Lind, Free P.L., Berkeley Heights, N.J.

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

 The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

 The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

The sophistication and decoration of this secretaire indicates that it was painted by a fine Parisian cabinetmaker.

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

Rococo Painted Caned Chairs

Rococo Caned Hand Painted Chairs

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

The Venetian gilt-and gesso decorated cabinet has painted ornaments in blue. Handles on the sides facilitated movement of this heavy piece, made about 1750.

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

This commode is painted in peach and beige tones, which blend with the blue,
rose, and beige floral arabesque designs on the drawers.

Robert Adam  The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

When Robert Adam described his decoration for the Etruscan Room at Osterley Park, he claimed that "the style of the ornament and the coloring are both evidently imitated from the vases and urns of the Etruscans." Believed at the time (1775-79) to be Etruscan, these artifacts were in fact Greek. The decoration is only faintly suggestive of its sources however: the figures on the walls and the vase-shaped splat of the chairs lack the flatness of those on Greek red-painted pottery, and the surrounding ornament bears a closer resemblance to Roman and Renaissance grotesques.

This cabinet were designed to match the scheme of walls of Thomas Chippendale designs.  Made in 1770, this cabinet was designed for David Garrick's villa in Hampton, Middlesex

This cabinet were designed to match the scheme of walls of Thomas Chippendale designs.  Made in 1770, this cabinet was designed for David Garrick's villa in Hampton, Middlesex

The Best Of Painted Furniture By Florence De Dampierre

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